Obedience 2017-02-13T13:45:31+00:00

Obedience

Why Train Your Dog?

Dogs, by nature, are pack animals with a well-defined social order. As you and your family become your dog's pack, your new dog will look to you – the leader of the pack – for guidance. Leadership can be established in a firm but friendly manner. Keep in mind that it is unrealistic to expect the dog to abide by the rules of the household without the leader teaching appropriate behavior!

Much like people, every dog is different. Some are hyperactive. Some are laid-back. Some are serious. Others are silly. Some are shy, and yet others have too much confidence. Regardless of these differences, training is necessary for all dogs and beneficial to your entire family.

Training will:

  • Help correct nuisance behaviors such as jumping on people, digging, barking, and chewing, while providing mental and physical activities for your dog.
  • Deepen the bond between you and your dog, and to increase the enjoyment, companionship and satisfaction of your relationship with your dog.
  • Ensure your dog's safety and happiness.
  • Nurture good canine companionship for the benefit of your family, neighborhood and community.
  • Allow you to enjoy the fun and excitement of competing in AKC events. You and your dog can earn certificates and titles while you continue to strengthen your communication and teamwork.

Types of Training Classes

  • Puppy Class – A developmental training course for the 3-to-5-month-old puppy. A puppy class emphasizes socialization with people and other puppies. Instructors usually offer information on growth, nutrition, grooming, housebreaking and problem-solving and teach basic household commands.
  • Basic Class – A basic training course for dogs 5-to-6 months and older, aimed at training you to train your dog. The basic class emphasizes the essential training commands needed to make a dog a good companion: heel on a loose leash, sit, stand, down, stay in position, and come when called. Instructors also usually provide information on nutrition, grooming and problem-solving. This basic training is important in keeping your dog safe.
  • Canine Good Citizen® (CGC) Class – May be a separate class or a part of a beginner class at AKC clubs and other organizations. CGC is a certification program that is designed to reward dogs that have good manners at home and in the community. Your dog will need to know the commands and exercises taught in a basic training class to qualify for a passing score on the CGC test. Dogs that pass the CGC test receive a certificate from the AKC and are recorded in the AKC's Canine Good Citizen Archive.
  • Training Classes for Companion Events – A variety of classes that prepare students and their dogs for competition in obedience, agility, tracking and other AKC events. You will be instructed in the levels of competition and titles available, how to teach your dog the required exercises, and the regulations that apply when you are competing.

Obedience Titles

AKC titles can only be earned at an AKC-licensed or member club trial. The Novice (CD) title must be completed before an exhibitor can enter the Open class. The Open title (CDX) must be earned before an exhibitor can enter the Utility class.

  • Companion Dog (CD) – The letters CD may be added after a dog's registered name when it has been certified by 2 different judges as receiving qualifying scores in Novice classes at three licensed or member obedience trials.
  • Companion Dog Excellent (CDX) – The letters CDX may be added after a dog's registered name after it has been certified by 2 different judges as receiving qualifying scores in Open classes at three licensed or member obedience trials.
  • Utility Dog (UD) – The letters UD may be added after a dog's registered name after it has been certified by 2 different judges as receiving qualifying scores in Utility classes at three licensed or member obedience trials.
  • Utility Dog Excellent (UDX) – Dogs with UD titles must earn qualifying scores in both Open B and Utility B at 10 trials in order to add the UDX title after their registered names.
  • Obedience Master (OM) – The letters OM may be added after a dog's name when it has earned a total of 200 OM points awarded to dogs earning a 190 or better from the Open B and Utility B classes based on the schedule of points established by the AKC Board of Directors. The OM will be followed by a numeric designation indicating the number of times a dog has met the requirements of the OM title up to 10.
  • Grand Master (OGM) – The letters OGM may be added after a dog's name when it has earned the 10th level of the Obedience Master title. Only one OGM title will be awarded.
  • Obedience Trial Champion (OTCH) – Dogs with UD titles must win 100 points and a first-place in Utility B and Open B, plus a third first-place win in either class, under three different judges.
  • National Obedience Champion (NOC) – The AKC awards this prestigious title annually to the dog that wins the AKC National Obedience Invitational. The letters NOC are placed before the dog's AKC-registered name and become part of the dog's permanent title.
  • Beginner Novice (BN) – The letters BN may be added after a dog's name when it has been certified by 2 different judges to have received qualifying scores in Beginner Novice classes at 3 licensed or member obedience trials.
  • Graduate Novice (GN) – The letters GN may be added after a dog's name when it has been certified by 2 different judges to have received qualifying scores in Graduate Novice classes at 3 licensed or member obedience trials.
  • Graduate Open (GO) – The letters GO may be added after a dog's name when it has been certified by 2 different judges to have received qualifying scores in Graduate Open classes at 3 licensed or member obedience trials.
  • Versatility (VER) – The letters VER may be added after a dog's name when it has been certified by 2 different judges to have received qualifying scores in Versatility classes at 3 licensed or member obedience trials
  • Pre–Novice (PCD) – The letters PCD may be added after a dog's name when it has been certified by 2 different judges to have received qualifying scores in Pre-Novice at 3 licensed or member obedience trials.
  • Pre–Open (PCDX) – The letters PCDX may be added after a dog's name when it has been certified by 2 different judges to have received qualifying scores in Pre-Open at 3 licensed or member obedience trials.
  • Pre–Utility (PUTD) – The letters PCD may be added after a dog's name when it has been certified by 2 different judges to have received qualifying scores in Pre-Utility at 3 licensed or member obedience trials.

Information about Obedience Trials
The AKC offers a wide variety of resources to assist anyone interested in obedience, whether you are new to the sport or want to know how to hold an obedience trial. Contact AKC Customer Service at 919-233-9767 or [email protected] to inquire about the following resources:

  • "Getting Started in Companion Events" – Informative brochure which outlines the basics of getting started in AKC Companion Events.
  • AKC Show Trial Manual – Manual designed to assist clubs in understanding the requirements, the paperwork, the personnel, and the many details that must be handled correctly to hold a successful obedience trial.

Akita Club of America

The Akita Club of America is a member of the American Kennel Club and, as such, is the only National Akita Breed Club which is recognized and sanctioned by the AKC. The main objectives of the Akita Club of America are the preservation and protection of the breed and improvement of the character and conformation of the Akita as described in the official breed standard.

About the Akita

A natural monument in Japan, the Akita’s proud heritage includes hunting large game such as bear, elk, and boar. This powerful and dignified member of the Working Group is renowned for courage and loyalty, but may not be tolerant of other animals. His luxurious double coat can include any combination of vibrant colors. Aloof toward strangers, they form strong family bonds. Highly intelligent with keen sense of humor, the Akita responds best to respectful commands and training techniques that rely on motivation rather than force. Strong-willed and proud, Akitas are not receptive to abusive methods. Akitas originated in Japan many, many years ago, and have been designated a natural monument of Japan. They are a large, impressive breed with natural guarding instincts. While generally reserved with people they don’t know, Akitas are affectionate with their family. They tend to be independent, and while they will always know where you are in your home, they do not need constant attention as do some of the more dependent breeds. For more about this amazing breed, please spend some time here at our site. There’s a wonderful world to explore.